DO YOU GUYS SHIP?

Do you ship live animals?

We ship with FedEx Priority Overnight but we still like to avoid extreme temperatures.  In the heat of the summer and the dead of winter we prefer not to ship any animals. There are some animals that do not handle the stress of shipping; for instance, frogs and

chameleons.

 

How long does shipping take?

We typically ship on Monday, for Tuesday arrival, and Wednesday, for Thursday arrival.

 

How much does it cost?

The price depends on the animals that are being shipped. Larger animals cost more to ship than small ones. Most small animals can be shipped anywhere in the lower 48 states for $50-$60. Larger boxes can cost upwards to $100.

 

RETURNS

What is your returns policy?

We prefer that animals do not go through the stress of coming and going multiple times but  making sure that you get the best pet for you is a priority for us here.

 

Do you refund?

We offer store credit. If something is not working out we are more than likely able to find you something that will. The store credit does not have to be spent immediately but can be saved for future purchases.

 

WHY DO I NEED TWO TYPES OF
LIGHT FOR MY LIZARD?

Heat lamps verses UVB lights:

Heat lamps are important for most lizards because they are cold blooded. In nature they rely on the sun to warm their bodies up so that they function properly. If they cannot get warm enough things as simple as digesting food cannot happen. Many of the heat bulbs on the market also but off UVA, but don't let that fool you. Those bulbs do not take the place of UVB bulbs. UVB bulbs come in many different styles and outputs. Without a proper UVB bulb your lizard can not use the vitamins that they need. MBD, Metabolic Bone Disease, is common with animals that are not provided with the right lights. MBD covers a number of disorders related to the weakening of the bone or impaired systems function caused by an imbalance in vitamin D3, calcium and phosphorus.

 

Keep in mind:

Putting your lizard near a window will not take the place of the UVB bulb, your window glass is filtering the UV out before it gets to him. Taking your lizard outside for short periods of time are good but that does not take the place of UVB bulbs.

 

You can learn more about what your species of lizards need and about what bulb options there are at these websites:

 

WHY CAN'T I BUY A BABY TURTLE?

Federal Law!

In an attempt to decrease the incidence of turtle-associated Salmonella infection in children, federal regulations restricting the sale of baby turtles became law in 1975. Some places around the country do not enforce the Federal law but we will not sell any turtles under 4".

 

Are there any exceptions? 

They can be sold for educational purposes, our Animal Health Inspector requires us to have a copy of your Kansas Teaching Certificate before we can special  order baby turtles.

 

 

I GOT LITTLE BUGS ON MY SNAKE!  HOW DO I GET RID OF THEM?

What are these bugs?

These bugs are called mites, and they are a small parasitic organism that utilize blood from the host as their whole food source.

 

How do I get them off my snake?

There are many ways to do this. One way is to soak the snake in a small container (with air holes) in warm water or a mild soapy water, for about 30 minutes. This will drown the majority of the mites on the snake. After soaking, a mite spray can be applied to the snake. Take care not to get any directly into the eyes or mouth. This process may need to be repeated over the course of a few weeks.

 

What about the enclosure?

It is very important to treat the enclosure along with the snake to prevent a recurring infestation. All decorations, hides, and bowls must be removed and treated with a mite spray. Once everything is out of the cage, completely clean the cage with mite spray or a

mild bleach solution. When returning the snake to its cage, it is best to use newspaper or paper towels as substrate until you are certain all mites are gone. Mites thrive in humid substrate, such as bark. Keep the cage clean and dry until infestation has been eradicated. This usually takes a couple weeks.

DOES MY LIZARD GET TIRED OF
EATING JUST CRICKETS?

Do they want some variety?

It is always good to give your lizards as much variety. In the wild, most lizards eat dozens of species of insects. It is important to give them vitamin supplements as well as variety.

 

What else can I feed them?

That depends on the type of lizard but we offer meal worms, super worms, earth worms and Dubia roaches. They say a Dubia roach is as high as 7 times as nutritious as a cricket.

 

HOW CAN I TELL AN ALLIGATOR FROM A COMMON SNAPPING TURTLE?

Alligator snapping turtles are very rare in Kansas, the state has confirmed 12 ever found here. Common snappers are commonly misidentified as Alligator snappers. In the last 14 years of being here we have taken literally hundreds of phone calls of people who claim they found an Alligator snapper, ALL (every single one) of them have been Common snappers.

 

Here are a few links that may help you see the differences between these two species of snapping turtles.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IS IT BETTER TO FEED MY SNAKE LIVE
OR FROZEN/THAWED RODENTS?

Which is better?

We hear this question all the time! The answer comes down to a matter of opinion. Live prey is fresh and the snakes do seem to enjoy them, however; a live rodent can easily wound a snake from biting. Frozen prey can not damage your snake by fighting back and is a more ethical option for feeding. Either option you choose, just make sure you feed an appropriately sized rodent for your snake.

 

Why doesn't my snake want to eat a frozen/thawed rodent?

Some snakes will accept a frozen thawed rodent the first time offered, others will not seem interested. We have found that nearly every snake will eat frozen thawed rodents, sometimes it just takes some convincing. Make sure the rodent has been completely thawed out and his temperature is slightly warmer than room temperture. This will interest the snake. Another trick is to use a long pair of tongs and "act" like the mouse is alive and walking around. These two methods combined have proven to be successful.

I READ THAT CALCIUM SAND WILL
KILL MY BEARDED DRAGON!

There are pros and cons with any substrate that you use.  It is best to find the one that works best for you and your lizard.  I personally like the calcium sand for small beardeds, the crickets cannot hide and it is easily cleaned by sifting it.  It is important that they do not eat it, we feed in dishes or on paper plates to ensure the sand does not stick to their food.  This is paramount with any loose substrate.  Some people like tiles or carpet, we know this works but in my experinces most people do not keep it clean enough.  I have many customers that complain about the increased smell because there is nothing absorbant to dehydrate the lizard's waste.  In my opinion there is no right or wrong answer but simply extra tasks that going along with whichever substrate choice you make.